Panjshir Necklace in Gold Vermeil and Lapis Lazuli (ON BACKORDER)
Panjshir Necklace in Gold Vermeil and Lapis Lazuli (ON BACKORDER)
Panjshir Necklace in Gold Vermeil and Lapis Lazuli (ON BACKORDER)

Panjshir Necklace in Gold Vermeil and Lapis Lazuli (ON BACKORDER)

Regular price €38,00
Unit price  per 
Tax included.

ITEM ON BACK ORDER. You will receive item in approx 5 weeks.

The Girih Collection is a collection of clean, contemporary, wearable art, lovingly handcrafted by Saeeda in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Made from gold vermeil and lapis lazuli semi-precious stones from Afghanistan.
Gold vermeil is excellent quality sterling silver thickly plated in gold.

DIMENSIONS:
Pendant Height: 1.2cm, Pendant Width: 2.8cm
Length of Chain: 43cm (17'').

Ships in 1-3 working days. Standard post to Ireland. Tracked post international.

About the artisan:

Saeeda Etebari was born in a refugee camp in Peshawar, Pakistan, in 1984. She became seriously ill during the first week of her life and was diagnosed with cerebral meningitis. Due to the illness, she did not walk for three years, and she lost her hearing. Her parents tried to find a cure for her loss of hearing, but nothing worked.

After the fall of the Taliban, Saeeda’s family returned to Kabul. She finished high school and even taught at the same school, but she did not find teaching as rewarding as she had hoped. When her brother suggested she study a craft instead, Saeeda enrolled in the Turquoise Mountain Institute.

“I chose jewelry because I love the focus and skill that making jewelry requires,” she says. “You need to be really precise and really patient. I can lose myself for hours when I’m working on a delicate piece. The more intricate the work, the more I enjoy it.” When asked how it feels to sell her works to others, she replies, “Designing a piece that somebody will buy and wear is a special experience for me. I love making a connection with someone through a shared sense of beauty.”

 About Turquoise Mountain:

Turquoise Mountain Trust work to ensure craftsmanship in war-torn countries survives, creating economic opportunities for craftspeople, supporting development projects, and changing consumer perceptions.